UNDERMINED JURIES AND EMPLOYEESMARK CUBAN AND SUJA THOMAS ON THE JURYTED ANIMATED VIDEO ON THE JURYTHE JURY IS A NEEDED, GOVERNMENTAL CHECKTHOMAS GIVES LECTURE ON THE JURY TO TAIWANESE JUDGES

UNDERMINED JURIES AND EMPLOYEES

Professor Thomas' recent books address shrinking American juries and unjust dismissals of employment discrimination cases.

Read Thomas' Books

TED ANIMATED VIDEO ON THE JURY

TED and Professor Thomas produced an animated video on the disappearing jury.

Watch the Video

THE JURY IS A NEEDED, GOVERNMENTAL CHECK

Professor Thomas discusses her book and the jury with Illinois Public Media and Maine Public Radio.

Listen to Thomas' Interviews

THOMAS GIVES LECTURE ON THE JURY TO TAIWANESE JUDGES

Professor Thomas met with judges from Taiwan in Chicago and discussed the jury in the United States.

Learn About Thomas' Recent Speaking Event

THE MISSING AMERICAN JURY

“I strongly recommend this book. Professor Thomas shares the importance of our jury system. It’s a right that you never think you will need… until you do.”

cuban

 MARK CUBAN

Entrepreneur, Owner of the Dallas Mavericks, Shark Tank star and proud to have done his civic duty as a juror

“Professor Thomas highlights a very real problem-as the number of jury trials declines in favor of ever more specialist judges and alternative procedures, justice may not always be best served.”

Boies1

DAVID BOIES

Runner-up for Time Magazine Person of the Year, Lawyer in Bush v. Gore

Wayne LaFave

Wayne LaFave

Wayne LaFave

Professor of Law, author of Search and Seizure, cited by US Supreme Court over 175 times

"The Missing American Jury deserves attention from anyone concerned with the quality of civil, and criminal justice in America today. Professor Thomas documents the decline in the use and power of criminal, civil and grand juries and the adverse impact this has had on our processes of justice, and then presents a series of provocative proposals for restoring these juries to meaningful roles."

Nancy Gertner

Nancy Gertner

Nancy Gertner

Former federal judge, Senior Lecturer on Law, Harvard University

"Thought-provoking and exhaustive, Professor Thomas’s book takes us to first premises-the core of the right to a jury trial and its undermining by the courts in decisions big and small. It is an important work, a must-read for lawyers, students, citizens, and most important, judges!"

Valerie P. Hans

Valerie P. Hans

Valerie P. Hans

Professor of Law, Cornell University, Co-author of American Juries: The Verdict

"The Missing American Jury offers a compelling portrait of the disturbing decline of the American jury, and what can be done to save this cherished democratic institution…Professor Suja Thomas brilliantly integrates historical and legal sources along with empirical research to demonstrate the causes of the jury’s decline. She then proposes a range of innovations designed to restore the jury’s power, including informing judges about the reasoning behind jury verdicts and enlightening jurors about plea offers and sentencing…Anyone who cares about the future of trial by jury should read this book."

Lawrence B. Solum

Lawrence B. Solum

Lawrence B. Solum

Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Georgetown University, Editor of Legal Theory Blog

"More than any other modern scholar, Suja Thomas has made the case for restoring the jury to its original role as a critical institution for the preservation of liberty and democracy. The Missing American Jury makes a powerful case that the original meanings of Article III and the Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Amendments have been ignored and distorted. This important book is essential reading for constitutional lawyers and scholars of both civil and criminal procedure."

Martin H. Redish

Martin H. Redish

Martin H. Redish

Louis and Harriet Ancel Professor of Law and Public Policy, Northwestern University

"In recent years, Suja Thomas has provided a vitally important scholarly voice reminding us of the importance of the jury as part of our nation’s adjudicatory structure. In this book, she makes her most important statement yet concerning the jury’s centrality as part of the nation’s government…This is a thoughtful and provocative book and while some may disagree with its conclusions, no one will dispute the significance of its scholarly contribution."

James Oldham

James Oldham

James Oldham

St. Thomas More Professor of Law and Legal History, Georgetown University

"Suja Thomas’s new book is a forceful effort to restore the jury to its rightful place in the apparatus of governance in the United States. She argues persuasively that the Supreme Court and a wide array of other forces and factors have unjustly marginalized the jury and have torpedoed its proper Constitutional functions. Her book is essential reading for legal historians and for all who are concerned by the diminished role of the Jury in American society."

Unequal: How America's Courts Undermine Discrimination Law

“This is must-read for all who care about workplace fairness and realizing the promise of our nation’s civil rights laws.”

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 DAVID LOPEZ

Former General Counsel of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Partner, Outten and Golden

“In this important book, Professors Sperino and Thomas painstakingly and poignantly disclose how courts have broken the promise of America’s workplace civil rights laws.”

SETH HARRIS

Former Acting and Deputy Secretary of Labor, Visiting Lecturer, Cornell Institute for Public Affairs

Sam Bagenstos

Sam Bagenstos

Frank G. Millard Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School

“Our civil rights laws make grand promises of equality and opportunity, but those promises are betrayed every day in courthouses throughout the Nation. By telling the stories of the real people who have been denied the rights Congress guaranteed them, Sperino and Thomas clearly illustrate the gap between promise and reality. This book is essential reading for scholars, lawyers, and any citizen who cares about our fundamental national commitment to equal rights.”

Nancy Gertner

Nancy Gertner

Nancy Gertner

Former federal judge, Senior Lecturer on Law, Harvard University

“Professors Sperino’s and Thomas’s book goes well beyond the academic articles that recite the virtual repeal of the civil rights laws (mine among them). They give content to the discussion—meaningful, detailed content—about the specific cases, their fact patterns, and the dismissive manner in which the courts too often deal with them. It is an eye opening account of how doctrine—procedural and substantive—has gone far afield from the language of the civil rights laws and the goals it was intended to accomplish. It is an important work, required reading for practitioners, scholars and judges.”